The Loss of a Great Writer

The loss of a great writer is like a swift punch to the stomach. It comes out of nowhere and completely takes my breath away, leaving me not only mourning the death, but also the loss of the incredible works of art I won’t get to consume.

We’ve lost so many great writers this year, and I hope to write about each one that touched me in time, but the recent death of Nora Ephron weighs heavily on my mind. Originally a journalist, she transitioned into writing plays and novels and writing, directing and producing films. I grew up watching movies like Sleepless and Seattle and When Harry Met Sally, and her words have long since become everyday phrases in my family.

Ephron was gifted at exposing the humor of everyday life and love, including topics like relationships, divorce, death and friendship – all in a relatable, eerily accurate way. I remember laughing repeatedly at the seemingly ridiculous scene in When Harry Met Sally when Jess and Marie move in together and have a huge fight about that “stupid, wagon wheel, Roy Rogers garage sale coffee table!”

Several years later, I’m now in the process of moving in with my fiancĂ© and unintentionally recreating the embarrassing wagon wheel coffee table argument, only this time it’s about a bright blue, 17-foot-long kayak.

So Nora, if you’re up there reading blogs in your spare time, know that you touched my life and inspired me to be a better writer. To try to capture even a hint of the humanity you put into your work. And I will work each day to be the heroine of my life, and not the victim, as you advised in your ’96 Wellesley commencement address.

You should also know that I’m now 50 percent owner of one very blue, very large kayak that resides on my patio.

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